Why You Should Create a Blog Schedule Part 2

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In part one of creating a blog schedule, I went over how to set up a personal website plan to gain a sense of structure. If you haven’t seen the blog worksheet printables I created to help get you started, check them out here and take a look below for more ideas.

Once you’ve settled on your content message/theme, your audience, and your post frequency, you’re on your way to a solid blogging start up. Now you can crack your knuckles and let the fun begin.

6. Plan Your Month 

Consider planning at least a month in advance. There’s nothing worse than coming up to the night before and realizing you have zilch. I went even further and planned out each month for 2017 and assigned a theme.

Tip: Don’t forget about those sneaky extra days in the month, either. I assigned my themes to each month, then realized several of them fell short one or two posts. Nothing to panic over, but you’ll save time by keeping that in mind right off the bat.

 

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7. Get Ahead

Going hand in hand with #6, go beyond settling your monthly posts. As I’m writing this, it’s December 31, 2016, and I’m not planning to post this until the third week in January (as you see, it’s been bumped up a week); I also wrote a post the other day that won’t be published until October. When an idea pops into  your head, the worst you can do is wait. Write several posts ahead, and all you’ll have to do is edit and hit publish when the time comes.

Determine your best schedule: Do you prefer to plan every step of the way, setting aside one day for writing, another for editing, and a third for creating your graphics/settling on the finishing touches? I personally set aside roughly 30 minutes each morning to work on my blog — just enough structure with some freedom to work on what I please.

You may not care to have every detail planned to the exact day and post, but even having something to fall back on saves hours and stress on the days you find yourself too busy or unable to write a single word.

8. Make Things Pretty

In planning mode, my writing is nearly illegible, the edges of the paper are filled with doodles, and I cross things out with a vengeance until the paper is torn. It’s hard to see a coherent thought.

Rewriting the posts into a monthly schedule meant I could quickly look back and see what I have planned for the month. You may wish to include this in your daily planner, pin it to an inspiration board, or create an online file.

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9. Share, Share, Share

Share your website on your other platforms. Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest, Facebook. If you’re into videos, create a youtube channel to match your website. Don’t fear what others think; have confidence in your passion and nurture it by allowing it to breathe…all over the internet.

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10. Don’t Be Afraid of Change

If you find your new schedule doesn’t work, change it. When you’ve contributed a chunk of time to a project and it falls through, you may be tempted to throw your computer in the dump… but don’t. Take time to figure out what isn’t working and what will make it work. Ask your followers what they think, or what they’d like to see. Get an outside opinion from a friend. There is no such thing as failure; you’re only learning how to do something a different way.

I’ve been blogging for about five years, and I’m no expert. My previous blog was quite small, and I have no idea where Confabulari will go. However, I do know how I feel when I’ve taken care and devoted time with a blog versus when things fell by the wayside, and if anything the first makes me feel confident, happy, productive, and creative.

If you open your blog, sigh with discontentment and find yourself disconnected from your own words, it’s time to reassess your desires and habits. A blog should be your safe haven, filling you with a sense of purpose and relief.

Tell me: How do you blog? Do you go by a schedule? Is it still working for you, or do you need to reevaluate your methods?

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